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HDR vs regular photography

hrspwr236

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Took some picture of one of my works finished projects

Kino Sports Complex - MLS Soccer Field

HDR


Full auto - point and shoot


This is a great comparison between typical photography and HDR imagery!
 

trd_sport

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This is not real hdr photography. Rather hdr imaging. HDR has been around forever, in fact many old iconic black and whites are technically hdr. This is just another way of accomplishing the image using a different process.
 

hrspwr236

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This is real HDR photography by definition, see the link below for detailed explination but it is essentially merging a regular exposure with one over exposed photo to get the detail in the highlights and and under exposed photo to get the detail in shadow. The photos above are 5 different exposures to bring out color and detail in varing light levels.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-dynamic-range_imaging
 

trd_sport

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I know what hdr photography is. That image is post processed. Merging multiple photos with different exposure levels is technically different than taking a single exposure photo and digitally manipulating it to hdr. If you did use multiple photos then work on the image because it has too much in the highlights. There are things wrong with it is all I'm saying lol.
Try to merge less than 5 and see how it turns out.
 
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hrspwr236

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I know what hdr photography is. That image is post processed. Merging multiple photos with different exposure levels is technically different than taking a single exposure photo and digitally manipulating it to hdr. If you did use multiple photos then work on the image because it has too much in the highlights. There are things wrong with it is all I'm saying lol.
Try to merge less than 5 and see how it turns out.

I typically do three but with the overcast day 5 usually works better depending on the shot and yest it is post process as my camera does not have the feature for auto merge. The highlights are high becuase the under exposure was coming out too bright. I was not able to take the photos during the right time of day.

looks like you cranked up the saturation

Yes, the saturation and vibrance has been increased.

the HDR photo looks fake

Alot of the HDR photography do and as long as you don't go too far, clients typically like see the photos like this

I am by no means a professional and working with low qualify equipment but i am happy with the results.
 

trd_sport

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Are you metering off the darkest and brightest points then bracketing from there? In manual mode.
 

hrspwr236

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I was using manual metering and ISO but everything else in Auto, if you think there is a better method I am open to suggestions.
 

trd_sport

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Ok. Manually meter the darkest and lightest points, that will be your range. Now using your manual settings adjust your fstop for the depth of field you want. Lower number means everything in the frame will be focus higher number means lower depth of field, works kinda backwards. Now adjust your exposure time. Going off the metered readings adjust in 2 step increments till the cover the whole range. Don't adjust your fstop while doing this however a general rule is for every fstop changed you'd need to adjust the exposure time by 2 in order to capture the same amount of light. Use a manual focus as well. Auto focus uses changes in contrast between edges to determine it's settings, so on a dim lit day it won't adjust properly. Now in processing don't turn up things so much that it looks overblown on the screen. Subtle is key. But hey if that's what your clients like then don't change a thing lol. There are some auto functions that let you adjust only exposure time or fstop and keep the other constant because they work together, if your not using that you're missing out on some of the range of the picture.
 
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